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Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)
scouting out locations or a fake science fiction movie titled "argo." this is about 30 minutes. >> if we could have everybody in the back come on up that's going to join us. thank you so much for your patience. the reports we were getting was that the traffic around the block was around as. apparently -- thank you. people are nodding, so that's good. thank you very much. there may be some people still held up and we will welcome them. welcome to the international spy museum. i'm peter earnest, executive director and i'll ask you as a courtesy, to those for recording the program and to the speakers, the kind enough to turn off your cell phones, pdas and so forth. that would be a big help. thank you. well, it's wonderful to see all of you here for the signing, and as we kick off the signing, i will show you a clip of the film based on the book for which you came to attempt the signing. so with that said we will go right ahead and come up and do the interview with tony. >> [inaudible] >> has shocked the civilized world. more than 60 american citizens continue to be held as hostages. >> six
treatment. our report from our chief science correspondent, robert bazell. >> reporter: for the first time ever, an experimental drug is showing great promise of slowing the alzheimer's disease. >> this is the first time we are seeing a slowing of the cognitive decline in patients with alzheimer's disease in this type of drug treatment. >> reporter: at first, the experimental drug seemed to fail as has every experimental drug to date. but when the manufacturer looked at it more closely, it found those with more mild disease had a less memory loss than those with the placebo, the 71-year-old retired expert still functions well. >> there are things that take a lot longer than they used to because i keep forgetting the order in which things have to be done. >> reporter: the results presented today combined studies with a total of 2,000 patients in the last two months. most scientists say it wouldn't be enough to reach the fda approval. but further studies show that it could help people with early alzheimer's disease. the drug is certainly not the cure that everybody wants, but for al krieger
to be less about public policy being guided by compromise and more about having it be guided by science and by -- [applause] by accurate public policy analysis, by studies show things like what are the rewards that are reaped from investment in public funding of contraception or in having a view of the insured as a society and what as a society we gain from that. what of the consequences if we don't? if it has been very disappointing to see the ways in which over the last few years science is really being pushed out of some much of our legislative process. there are bills that have been enacted across the country requiring medical providers to give statements to women who are coming for services, frequently abortion services that are based on the ranchers science. and that is a scary moment, regardless of how you feel about abortion and what your personal legal police are up at to what to require medical professionals to the mislead their patience is not where we should be as a country, and that in those type of scientific facts and accurate public policy analyses should be given much m
location for a fake science fiction movie titled "argo." it's about thirty minutes. if we can have nerve the back come on. thank you for your patience. we have -- the reports we were getting was that the traffic around the block here was horrendous. apparently thank you, people are nodding. that's good. thank you very much. so there may be some people held up still. we'll welcome them. welcome to the international spy museum. i'm peter, the executive directer. ly ask you as a court sei those who are recording the program and the speakers to be kind enough to turn off your cell phone, pda and so forth. that would be a big help. thank you. that said we'll go ahead and come up and do the interview with tony. the people die. we want the six of them out. what we want is -- deliver the six by providing them with -- you can send them training wheels and get them to the board we are gatorade. it would take a miracle to get them out. what are we watching? i have an idea. there are canadian film crew for science fiction. we file together as a company. this is how we make a big movie. you want to c
. and a lot of bad news coming out of research by the australian institute of marine sciences that as you pointed out half of the coral in the great barrier reef has declined largely due to both tropical storms, a crown of thorns starfish that feeds on the coral up to 40% declined just from the starfish alone and of course climate change and coral bleaching. >> so storms, starfish, climate change. what can we do to stop the coral loss? >> well, this is some scary news. this is much more than anyone expected. but there is a little bit of a silver lining. we believe the crown of thorns starfish in their larva stages grow faster because of runoff and fertilizer off the coast of australia. so scientists are calling for vehicler controls on that runoff going into the reef which may help to reduce the population of the crown of thorns starfish and hopefully relieve some of the pressure. they believe up to 42% of the decline of the great barrier reef has been caused by extreme outbreaks of these crown of thorns starfish. so hopefully reducing runoff can have a positive impact and allow the reef
baby. >> doing math with the gets? >> doing s.t.e.avenue. m. >> science, technology, engineering, art and math. >> hey, do you do "gangnam style." >> what does that mean? >> gangnam sfooil? >> psy. the horse dance. >> the horse dance. >> you got it. >> like that. >> there we go. >> oh, yeah. oh, yeah. ♪ >> almost as good as david gregory. >> you name, it elmo can do it. >> there we go. >> that was fantastic. >> let's talk about -- did you read the "new york times." >> yeah, "new york times." there's an article that the word really is overused. >> really? >> really. >> really. >> a whole article devoted to, that really? >> really. >> it used to be kind of like that's surprising, but now it's that snarky really? >> really. >> really. >> it has been overused. by the writers and shows to make that kind of funny turn. it has been a little overused. what are some other -- i'm actually thinking of like, you know, like. >> like, and, you know, i'm a complete offender. >> seriously. >> serious ly. >> really? >> what words are overused? >> elmo loves overusing love. >> oh. >> you can't overus
to come, cheeseburgers, fries, milk shakes in the name of science. >> why people are loading up on the fast food and getting paid amazing money to do it. it is all coming up. ♪ cheeseburger in paradise ♪ heaven on earth ♪ >> the next story either seems like a dream come true or a disaster waiting to happen. eating fast food, every day, and getting paid thousands to do it. >> big money here. all a new experiment conducted by doctors to measure exactly what fast food diets can do to you. abc's john donvan has the story. >> reporter: hitting the fast food drive-in for science. >> can i get five soft tacos. two sausage burritos. >> reporter: over and over and over again. it has been dave's life the past three months or so as has been eating the food. a precisely measured, 1,000 calories a day, extra meal daily, fast food only. >> how many calories? >> 770. >> reporter: why? this man is paying them to. dr. samuel klein a researcher at washington medical school in st. louis trying to understand why weight gain ladies to diseases like diabetes and hypertension and how that relate
-in for science. >> can i get five soft tacos. >> can i get two sausage burritos? can i get a number four? >> reporter: over and over and over again. it's been dave giocolo's life the past three months or so. as has been eating the food. a precisely measured 1,000 calories a day -- an extra meal daily -- fast food only. how many calories? >> 770. >> reporter: why? because this man is paying him to. dr. samuel klein is a researcher at washington university medical school in st. louis, trying to understand why weight gain leads to diabetes and hypertension. and how that relates to levels of fat in the liver and muscles. at some point, research on rats alone just isn't enough. somebody has to eat this food this way to -- >> ultimately, it has to come to people. >> reporter: and a radio ad -- >> attention overweight volunteers -- >> reporter: -- that offered a cash incentive, up to $3,500. depending on how long it would take. >> once i got into work, i called them right away. >> reporter: so did nurse dawn freeman. >> it probably took a month to just get -- >> reporter: to get approved, to g
: hitting the fast food drive-in for science. >> can i get five soft tacos? can i get two sausage burritos? can i get a number four? >> reporter: over and over and over again, it has been dave giocolo's life the past three months or so. as has been eating the food. a precisely measured 1,000 calories a day. a fast food daily only. how many calories? >> 770. >> reporter: why? this man is paying them to. dr. samuel klein is a researcher at washington university in st. louis. trying to understand why fast food leads to weight gain and diseases like diabetes and hypertension. at some point, though, research on rats alone is not enough. somebody has to eat the food? >> ultimately, it has to come to people. >> reporter: and so, a radio ad, that offered a cash incentive, up to $3,500, depending on how long it would take. >> once i got into work, i called right away. >> reporter: so did nurse, dawn freeman. >> it probably took a month, to just get -- >> reporter: to get approved? >> to get approved. >> reporter: so, they ate every day, from one of these five restaurants, until their weight went up
multivitamin backed by thirty years of science. try centrum® silver. visit centrum-dot-com for your three dollar coupon. try centrum® silver. there's the sign to the bullpen. here he comes. you wouldn't want your doctor doing your job, the pitch! whoa! so why are you doing his? only your doctor can determine if your persistent heartburn is actually something more serious like acid reflux disease. over time, stomach acid can damage the lining of your esophagus. for many, prescription nexium not only provides 24-hour heartburn relief, but can also help heal acid-related erosions in the lining of your esophagus. talk to your doctor about the risk for osteoporosis-related bone fractures and low magnesium levels with long-term use of nexium. possible side effects include headache, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. other serious stomach conditions may still exist. let your doctor do his job. and you do yours. ask if nexium is right for you. if you can't afford your medication, astrazeneca may be able to help. promise full whitening results in two weeks or more. rembrandt® deeply white™ 2 hour w
-span, there would be blood in the streets. >> we're going to talk about neuro science >> reporter: in the end e-health's lobbying was successful in changing the rules. low-income americans will be allowed to use their subsidies to buy insurance on e-health. did you have to write a proposed regulation to hand them? >> we've written a lot. at the end of the day the regulation didn't use all of our language. that was fine. but it caught the essence of this. and it included some things that these people in health and human services thought were important which we agreed with. >> that was a good meeting i would say that the process here is far from elegant. the process here involves influence >> you guys still do a lot of military? >> democracy is a messy way of governing yourself. and there are imperfections that people vote for bills that they don't read. they vote for words that lobby i haves have written. but it is the system that's better than any other system. we just have to make it better in my view by having more transparency. ♪ >> osgood: coming up, the cold facts. ♪ into a scooter tha
thing. that would point to anger and aggression. thank goodness we have science to teach us these. >> that's "pop news." >> listen, i always say to you, george, i'm here for you. >> thank you very much. sam, we're so glad you're here for us this morning. >> good morning, gang. hey, take a look at this columbus day crowd in times square. we are going all the way down to 45th street, basically, we've got such a long line here. good morning, everybody. >> good morning. >> thank you. tell me your name. it's your birthday? >> dawn. >> dawn, where are you from? >> albuquerque, new mexico. >> happy birthday. thanks for spending it with us. good morning, everybody. it's pierogi day? today's pierogi day? let's get to the happy pierogi day. we're going to start with the rain on the eastern seaboard. now, it is more south earlier in the day. by nighttime the rain is in d.c. and continues up the coastline. and most of the nation is dry. all that warm air in the west, though, is going to get a knockdown so look at l.a., 77 today, 67 on wednesday. a big change in san diego as well. even in ph >
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science isn't my strong suit, myrna gives me a more physical task. >> i'm going to have you follow wes's lead here and he's going to show you what we're looking at as we're trying to make sure we've got everything, nothing is settling on the bottom of the vat. >> is that what brokit up into this? >> that's what makes it firmer. >> can i touch it? >> when you cut it and it's really, really mushy. the more they cure it the firmer it's going to get. >> oh, my gosh. my arm hurts. i swear this job is the best arm workout. >> hooping involves scooping curds into cheesecloth, and spring sprinkling salt and rolling it all together. it's fast, furious and heavy. >> put it over the top and put your hand here. >> we pack the curds into wheels and add more salt. >> it's like playing in sand. >> pretty much. >> it's a preservative, a flavoring and also a way of bringing the moisture level down in the cheese. >> am i doing it right? >> we're in one of the caves where the bleu cheese ages and it takes about six months. >> you can kind of see the bleu starting to grow on the outside. what's starting t
i didn't like science, i was only a fan of the show quincy. >> my mom and dad were scared. but being funny at home, was encouraged 24 hours a day. yeah. >> sometimes with kids -- >> i got it from them. >> sometimes the kids are trying figure out their journeys and you realize possibly the answer is there but you're looking past it. >> that was fine, kevin, thank you. >>> the first "american idol" kelly clarkson is celebrating 10 years with a greatest hits album. clarkson was crowned the winner in 2002. she's now 30 years old and is proud of everything she's accomplished. she's releasing a new song this month called "catch my breath." her great hits cd will be available in november. >> should be a great cd. >>> if you don't routinely give your dog heartworm medicine, you don't want to miss our next segment. annie will introduce us to carson who is heartworm positive. now, how he's doing with his recovery and how you can protect your own dog. >> fresh rock oysters -- local oysters. this morning holly is teaching us about a program to help save the chesapeake bay. coming up next, how to
in the name of science. i should actually enlist in that focus group. >> we could be millionaires. great -- all the food on this show. >> we would be large -- living literally. >>> first, the manhunt along the u.s./mexico border. president obama has called the family of 30-year-old border patrol agent nicholas ivy who was killed early yesterday. >> mr. obama promised that ivy's family that those responsible will be found. abc's cecilia vega reports from southern, arizona. >> reporter: it is remote, dangerous, and deadly, and it was here on this dusty stretch of land where arizona meets mexico that three border patrol agents were fired on. one made it out safely. another was shot twice and expected to recover. but the third agent, 30-year-old nicholas ivy, was shot dead. >> we suspect that this is probably some type of narcotics trafficking event. that these agents encountered. but at this time, that would be speculative. >> reporter: the three agents headed to a spot just three miles north of the border. as they headed up a desert hill, someone fired right at them in what is being descri
infrastructure that's truly needed because of the real opportunity of a medical science that we developing in this country. 21st century science is truly one of the innovations that we in america really has the best in the world. we're stuck, unfortunately, with 20th century delivery of health care. this kind of national infrastructure must be developed and thankfully with our private partners, we have visionary leaders such as people at intel, verizon, at and t and bank of america, who have partnered with us to actually build this super highway, as well as a super computer so we can bring this -- not only just for our cou expore world. >> gretchen: wow. what an amazing story and for people who are battling cancer, or those in the future, this is good news as far as a time line and treatment. doctor, thank you so much. >> thank you. >> gretchen: amazing. more "fox & friends" just two minutes away my name is hunter cannon. playing sports is just my whole life. looking back, if it wasn't for shriners hospital, things would just be really, really different. i lost my leg when i was a kid. the
and science teachers to improve our education, doubling our exports, all those things that will help create jobs as we move forward and strengthen our economy. i was struck by kevin's answer about the fact that once again the romney campaign says they really don't have time to discuss the specifics of their tax plan. and, you know, this is a $5 trillion tax cut for the wealthy. >> we also haven't heard the specifics of what the president prepared to do in terms of spending cuts as well. >> i don't think that's true. if you look at the budget plan that the president is outlining, $4 trillion spending cut plan that deals with making sure that our tax code is fair and that those that are on the upper end of that tax code are pay iing a little bit more. let's be clear, mitt romney's $5 trillion tax plan isn't hard to explain because of the time. it's hard to explain because of the math. the math doesn't add up. $5 trillion isn't paid for. what that requires, as economic studies have shown, is that mitt romney will have to raise taxes on middle class families. >> speaking of middle class familie
to the campaign. megyn: the latest forecast from political science professors at university of colorado predict a mitt romney victory. they predict president obama will win just 16 states and mitt romney will care why it other 33 states all in red and win the presidency with an electoral college total of 330 votes. he's a political signs professor at the university of colorado. i look at this and i think, what? you have him winning new mexico. obama is up by 10 in the latest poll. pennsylvania. that's tightening but real clear politics has obama up by 6. you have romney winning wisconsin, too. >> it's true the meda modal shos obama losing. but six weeks ago when the preliminary model was released the president was up in many of the states which are now tightening and in many where romney has moved ahead. megyn: this came out in august. we thought those guys must be nuts. we still had huge numbers. just huge, huge numbers in the electoral college. but then it turns out the race is tightening and now, you say that if you apply your model going back to every election to 1980, it is accurate? >> we
. and so, you know, eventually i ended up in you see santa barbara as a student of political science. i think having grown up rural and kind kind of small, i guess i never imagined i could work in the white house or be part of the political campaign like the obama campaign. so i always coming in now, i was let the chance to do is talk like this because i hope there is something a mystery that might be inspiring as you allege are your success. and i think washington d.c. was for me on the other side of the road when i was going up but i know the world is smaller now and more accessible. but i think we can dream big dreams as my boss likes to tell me. my old boss likes of tommy. so we are going to talk about kind of my path to the white house. just quickly though, so i like to say that everything i learned about winning and success they learned on the campaign trail. there is always a winner and a loser. the political environment, just like the business world is highly competitive. and with every campaign season, there's always innovation incubators if you will. and so, guess the campaign
. harder, go for it. bash it around. there's no science to this. that's beautiful. toss them in. okay. >> what's in here? >> toss it in here. mortar style, old school. >> cave man. >> cave man cuisine art. >> this weighs a ton. >> that goes right in. you got it. there you go. we're going to add some oil. now the one thing about this, guys, you need to cut them chunky or else they are not going to get crispy. >> we like them chunky. >> hoda likes her men that way too. >> i'm in her ball league. >> that's another story. if you don't have a mortar at home -- >> who does? i don't know one person who has one of these, i put a plant in that. >> on top, we're putting them in for about 450 degrees, 25 minutes. don't even think about them. >> smell them burning. >> a little charred is a good thing. we're going to make a dressing with tahini. >> i like tahini. >> what is it in everyone knows? >> hummus, give me some. >> i thought it was an island in the pacific. >> it's made out of sesame seeds. peanut butter but with sesame seeds. we're going to make a dressing. you're whisking, you're pouring
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)

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